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Gallery
Market Place Market Place
Note the new building in the photo on the corner.
Regent Street Regent Street
Note the 'Old Red Lion Hotel'
Chapmangate Chapmangate
Note the independent chapel built in 1807 to the left.
The Silburn family of Pocklington
The Silburn family information has been kindly provided by Mike Silburn, a descendant of the family.

The Silburns of Pocklington

The following is the timeline for the descendants of James Silburn (1763 – 1829) – Click to see the Family Tree. The timeline will identify major events and has transcriptions of BMD certificates; links to Family Search records (IGI); newspaper extracts and links to relevant pages on the Pocklington History website.

James Silburn (1763 – 1829)

The timeline of the family tree starts with James Silburn, a butcher, plying his trade in Pocklington. James was born, 18th September and christened: 18th October 1763 in Pocklington, IGI Link. His parents were probably James Silburn (1731 – ) and Mary Rusling (1732 - ) who were married 20th January 1761, Pocklington Parish Records. Although this relationship cannot be stated with complete certainty, I have not, as yet, found any evidence of other possible parents. James was a butcher and freeholder in Swine Market Pocklington which is confirmed in several trade directories including the 1791 Universal Directory, and 1823 Baines Directory.
James married Harriot Smeathman, 15th January 1793 in Pocklington, Pocklington Parish Records. Harriot was the daughter of Lovel Smeathman (1728 – 1793) and Mary nee Byass (1732 – 1821) and she was christened in Pocklington on the 22nd May 1772, IGI Link.
James and Harriot had 6 children, namely, John, William, Mary Ann, James, Harriot, and James
James Silburn died 8th February 1829, age, 65, with an inscription in the north transept of Pocklington Church.
The probate of his will shows that he left some land and property in Pocklington to his family.
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Probate copy will of James Silburn of Pocklington gentleman:
ref. DDPY/29/154 - date: 19 Jun 1829
Beneficiaries: wife; daughter Mary Ann; son John Silburn Property: house with four closes (eight acres) adjoining; 13 acres land; house; all in Pocklington Witnesses: Thomas Knowlton Wilson, Pocklington, farmer, Nathaniel Holmes, Pocklington, attorney, Nathaniel Holmes junior, Pocklington, clerk to Nathaniel Holmes Will dated 10 Jun 1825 Probate 19 Jun 1829.
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The location of this property is possibly that illustrated on the Easton Map and in the associated Directory of 1845 which shows that John Silburn, James’ son, as well as owning Silburn's Yard and butcher's shop in Swine Market also owned 27 through 35 Union Street. These properties stretched either side of the passage way leading to Silburn's Yard located between the Catholic Church and Martin's yard just across the Beck from Teresa Cottage.

Harriot died on 25th April 1844 and the following is the transcription of her death certificate.
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Registration District Pocklington
1844 Death in the Sub-district of Pocklington in the County of York
No: 274
1. When and where died: Twenty fifth April 1844 Pocklington
2. Name and Surname: Harriot Silburn
3. Sex: Female
4. Age: 71 years
5. Occupation: Widow of James Silburn Butcher
6. Cause of Death: Dropsy
7. Signature, description and residence of informant: The X Mark Ellen Easton present at the death Pocklington
8. When Registered: Twenty Seventh April 1844
9. Signature of registrar: Edward Danson Registrar
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Harriet died at Teresa Cottage, which at the time was in the possession of John Singleton who was married to her daughter Mary Ann. The passing was announced in the York Herald.
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The York Herald - Saturday 27 April 1844
DEATHS. On Thursday, the 25th instant, at Teresa Cottage, Pocklington, Harriet, relict of the late Mr. Jas. Silburn. of that place.
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The Children of James and Harriot Silburn

The children of James and Harriot were John, William, Mary Ann, James, Harriot, and James.

John Silburn (1794 - 1867)

John was the eldest child and was born 29th January and christened 6th February 1794, IGI Link. He followed his father into the family business as a butcher The White's Directory of 1831 records him as one of the town’s butchers in the Swine Market and this I presume was in Silburn’s Yard that is shown on the Easton map. He married Eliza Powell, the daughter of a Pocklington Solicitor, James Powell, on the 6th September 1824, IGI Link, and an announcement of the event appeared in The Yorkshire Gazette
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1824. September. 6. — Married, at Pocklington, Mr John Silburn, son of Mr James Silburn, to Eliza, eldest daughter of Mr Powell, attorney.
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Eliza died 7th September 1849. There is no cause of death on the certificate but it was not necessary to provide a doctor's certificate when registering a death until 1879. The transcription of her death certificate follows:-:
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Registration District Pocklington
1849 Death in the Sub-district of Pocklington in the County of York
No: 6
1. When and where died: Seventh September 1849 Pocklington
2. Name and Surname: Eliza Silburn
3. Sex: Female
4. Age: 49 years
5. Occupation: Wife of John Silburn Butcher
6. Cause of Death: /
7. Signature, description and residence of informant: The X Mark of Ann Holderness present at the death Pocklington
8. When Registered: Tenth September 1849
9. Signature if registrar: Charles Danson Deputy Registrar
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Five years later John married again, this second time to Elizabeth Spicer nee Binnington, the widow of John Spicer, a farmer at Hessle. In the 1841 census Elizabeth was a servant at Hesslewood House, Hessle, which was the home of John Pease, a banker, and his family. She married John Spicer in 1849 and was left a widow in 1852. The transcription of the marriage certificate of John and Elizabeth follows:-
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1854 Marriage solemnized at the Parish Church in the Parish of Scarborough in the County of York
No: 205.
1. When Married: May 1
Groom:
2. Name and Surname: John Silburn
3. Age: 55
4. Condition: Widower
5. Rank or Profession: Butcher
6. Residence at time of Marriage: Pocklington Co. of York
7. Father's Name and Surname: James Silburn
8. Rank of Profession of Father: Butcher
Bride:
2. Name and Surname: Elizabeth Spicer
3. Age: 36
4. Condition: Widow
5. Rank or Profession: -
6. Residence at time of Marriage: Scarborough
7. Father's Name and Surname: Thomas Binnington
8. Rank of Profession of Father: Gentleman

Married in the Church of St Mary according to the Rites and Ceremonies of the Established Church, by License or after ___ by me, George Hogarth Curate

This Marriage was solemnized between us; Jno Silburn, Elizabeth Spicer
In the Presence of us, Hen, Powell, Sarah Powell
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Moving onto 1861 John is residing at Allerthorpe Hall and the census indicates that he is a farmer of 150 Acres, Also at the Hall are his son Henry, 22, and stepson John Spicer, 11. Elizabeth isn't there, instead she can be found in North Dalton visiting with her family the Binningtons.

John dies 6th May 1867, still at Allerthorpe, and the transcription of his death certificate follows:
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Registration District Pocklington
1867 Death in the Sub-district of Pocklington in the County of York
No: 465
1. When and where died: Twenty eighth May 1867 Allerthorpe
2. Name and surname: John Silburn
3. Sex: Male
4. Age: 71 years
5. Occupation: Landed Proprietor
6. Cause of death: Marasmus Certified
7. Signature, description and residence of informant: x the mark of Sarah Rowley present at the death Barmby Moor
8. When registered: Thirty first May 1867
9. Signature of registrar: F Johnson Registrar
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A factor that might have contributed to his death is the accident he was involved in just seven months before his demise. An account of the event appeared in the York Herald:
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York Herald - Saturday 15 September 1866
POCKLINGTON.
Accident. — On Tuesday, Mr. Silburn, of Allerthorpe Hall, and his son (Mr. Henry Silburn), after a day's shooting, met with an accident. It seems that they proceeded to leave the farm in a dog-cart, and had not proceeded more than one hundred yards before they kindly took up two females and a little girl. The load, however, proved too heavy, and the consequence was that both shafts broke off. They all turned completely over, and in that most dangerous position they were dragged for a considerable distance, the horse kicking, but fortunately disentangling itself and galloping away. They all escaped injury with the exception of Mr. Silburn, who flesh-rent his leg, which will deprive him for some time of his gun.
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After John's death the Yorkshire Gazette contains an advertisement which shows Elizabeth selling the hall after she moves to Filey in Yorkshire
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Yorkshire Gazette - Saturday 14 December 1867
ALLERTHORPE HALL, EAST YORKSHIRE.
ON SALE, Private Contract, the ESTATE FOR LIFE of a Lady aged 46, of and in the substantial and commodious Mansion, known as "Allerthorpe Hall" (which comprises spacious Entrance Halls, Dining and Drawing Rooms, Breakfast, Study, Nursery, and Housekeepers' Rooms, Six Bed and Two Dressing Rooms, Six Servants' Bedrooms and Suitable Offices), with tho Yard, Garth, Garden, Orchard, Pleasure Grounds, Stabling for eight horses, double Coach-house, Granary, Fold Yard, and other Outbuildings belonging, with the Parcel of LAND in front called "Cow Pasture," containing, with the sites of the buildings, about 4a. 2r. 30p., and copyhold. Fine certain. Also the Freehold CROFT adjoining, containing about 2r. 30p. The grounds adjoin the unfenced-off property of Mr. Henry Silburn, and a small strip of Land for which an annual rent of 5s. is paid to the Lord of the Manor. The residence is surrounded ornamental Pleasure Grounds, well-stocked Orchard, Kitchen and Fruit Garden containing a Vinery. Allerthorpe Hall is about mile and half from Pocklington, twelve from York, and within reach of the Holderness and other hounds. Immediate possession may be had, and cards to view, and additional particulars obtained on application at our Offices.
POWELL and SON, Solicitors,
Pocklington and Market Weighton.
Nov. 1, 1867.
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William Silburn (1797 - )

William was born 2nd July and christened 14th July 1797 in Pocklington, IGI Link. I have been unable to identify William as an adult. He probably died in his youth as there appears to be no mention of him in the 1829 will of his father James.

Mary Ann Silburn (1799 – 1853)

Mary Ann was born on the 18th April and christened just 2 days later on the 20th April 1799, IGI Link. She married John Burnell on the 15th September 1828, IGI Link, the event being announced in the York Herald.
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York Herald of 27 Sept 1828
Marriages
On Tuesday last, at Pocklington, by Rev T Brown, John Burnell of Middleton Lodge, second son of the late Martin Burnell, Esq, to Mary Ann, only daughter of Mr James Silburn, of Pocklington.
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They lived in Teresa Cottage, Pocklington. John Burnell died in 1837 and subsequently Mary married John Singleton on New Year's Eve 1840. The transcription of their marriage certificate follows:-
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1840 Marriage solemnized by Licence in the Parish of Gt Givendale in the County of York
No: 3
1. When Married: Decr 31
Groom:
2. Name and Surname: John Singleton
3. Age: 34
4. Condition: Bachelor
5. Rank or Profession: Gentn
6. Residence at time of Marriage: Gt Givendale
7. Father's Name and Surname: John Singleton
8. Rank of Profession of Father: Gentn
Bride:
2. Name and Surname: Mary Ann Burnell
3. Age: 41
4. Condition: Widow
5. Rank or Profession: -
6. Residence at time of Marriage: Pocklington
7. Father's Name and Surname: James Silburn
8. Rank of Profession of Father: Butcher

Married in the Church according to the Rites and Ceremonies of the Ch of England by me, W R Griesbach Vicar

This Marriage was solemnized between us, J Singleton Junr, M A Burnell
In the Presence of us, Richd Nicholson, Jas Rd Singleton, Ann Singleton, Jane Maria Singleton
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Mary Ann died 2nd November 1853. The transcription of her death certificate follows:-
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Registration District Pocklington
1853 Death in the Sub-district of Pocklington in the County of York
No: 38
1. When and where died: Second November 1853 Pocklington 
2. Name and surname: Mary Ann Singleton
3. Sex: Female
4. Age: 53 years
5. Occupation: Wife of John Singleton Gentleman
6. Cause of death: Bronchitis Certified
7. Signature, description and residence of informant: Thomas Wilson M.D. Present at the death Pocklington
8. When registered: Third November 1853
9. Signature of registrar: D Lee Registrar
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There is no evidence of Mary Ann having had any children in either of her marriages.

James Silburn (1800 - )

James was born 13th December and christened on Christmas day, 1800, IGI Link. It would appear that this James did not survive to his fourth birthday as a second James is christened in October 1804.

Harriot Silburn (1803 – 1803)

Harriot was born 10th January, and christened on the 16th January 1803 in Pocklington, IGI Link. She dies of a fever before the year is out and is buried on the 15th November 1803

James Silburn (1804 - )

A second James was born 2nd October and christened on the 12th October, 1804, IGI Link. I have been unable to identify James as an adult.

The Children of John and Eliza Silburn

The children of John and Eliza were James, John, William, and Henry.

James Silburn (1825 - 1852)

James was christened 15th July 1825 in Pocklington, IGI Link. He was the eldest son of John Silburn, and Eliza Powell and followed in his father's profession as a butcher resident in the Swine Market area of Pocklington. His main claim to fame was an amateur archaeologist who carried out approximately 20 excavations of ancient burial barrows in the Huggate, Waterwold and Blanche areas in the early 1850s. A description of which barrows James excavated and how he went about it are recorded in John Mortimer's book "Forty Years' Researches in British and Saxon Burial Mounds of East Yorkshire". His exploits are also mentioned in “The Early Barrow Diggers” by Barry M Marsden, which takes much of its material from Mortimer’s book. Mortimer says
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He dug into some twenty mounds and gathered a collection of relics, but left only the most brief and uninformative notes, revealing only the barest details of his finds, such as 'urn from a barrow on Huggate Wold, Oct 27th 1851' and urn found inverted in barrow on Warter Wold, November 13th 1851'.
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Mortimer re-excavated many of James barrows and said he used he used to leave a lead tablet stamped 'Jas Silburn', in the graves he cleared. In recent times there has been much criticism of the damage these early ‘diggers’ to ancient sites but Mortimer in his book commented more than once on the careful nature of Silburn's work. He said:-
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One grave had been excavated 'in a very thorough manner, not always adopted at that period.' Another had been 'carefully opened by Silburn by making two large cuts about one foot apart, reaching from near the western to the eastern margin of the barrow. Five other tumuli 'had been carefully opened by Silburn in a very careful and creditable manner'
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James is credited with a couple of the pottery items listed in the British Museum Collection. I read somewhere that Mortimer visited Henry, James brother, and he handed over what James had recovered from the barrows.

James was also interested in coin collecting. I have found archives of auction lots mentioning James. and there is a mention in one Numismatic Publication recording the death of a subscriber James Silburn in 1852.
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MESSRS. S. LEIGH SOTHEBY & JOHN WILKINSON, AUCTIONEERS of LITERARY PROPERTY, and WORKS
THE COLLECTION OF COINS AND MEDALS,
Numismatic Books and Antiquities, formed by Mr. JAMES SILBURN, of Pocklington, comprising, some English Silver Coins Patterns and Proofs in Silver — English and Foreign Medals in Bronze — a Series of interesting Medals of eminent Men - Royal and other examples illustrative of English History — Proofs of Provincial Tokens, in Silver and Copper — a few Miscellaneous Antiquities and Numismatic Books, including an Illustrated Copy of Sharp's Catalogue of Provincial Coins and Tokens — Private Portraits of Coin Collectors and Literary Characters — Catalogues of important Sales, with prices and names.
_________________________________________________________

_________________________________________________________
CHRISTIES
NIGHTINGALE, Benjamin. A large collection of approximately 113 autograph letters comprising some 382 pages, including a few drawings, 8° or smaller, all from Nightingale to his fellow numismatist, James Silburn M. D. of Pocklington, Yorkshire, almost all from Nightingale's home at Clare Cottage, Wandsworth Road, London, dated 2 June 1847 to 8 May 1851, bound in a modern dark blue half calf album (184 x 140mm.), spine titled in gilt.
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Benjamin Nightingale was a London wine and spirit merchant with a keen interest in coins and was a member of the Numismatic Society of London. He also was a maker of Tokens. James name also appears on the subscription lists of a number of Antiquarian and Numismatic publications

James was still a bachelor when he died of tuberculosis when he was just 26 years of age. There is a mention of it in Marsden's book "Early Barrow Diggers" and the quote is:
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"Sadly, Silburn caught a bad chill whilst digging a mound on Blanche Farm on 24 February 1852, succumbing on 17th April, fittingly enough in the ardent pursuit of his amateur interest. He was twenty six years old".
_________________________________________________________
The death was announced in a local newspaper
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Yorkshire Gazette - Saturday 24 April 1852
DEATHS
On Saturday, the 17th inst., at Pocklington, aged 26 James, eldest son of Mr. John Silburn, of that place. During his short life he had conciliated the esteem and goodwill of all who knew him; and his early death is not only a subject of deep affliction to his family, but a real misfortune to the inhabitants of his native town, inasmuch as they are thus deprived of the active services of one, whose attainments, disposition, and circumstances gave promise of much future usefulness.
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An inscription for him together with his parents is amongst the Pocklington Church Inscriptions.
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"Eliza Silburn, daughter of James Powell, attorney-at-law, died Sept. 7. 1849, aired 49. James Silburn died April 17. 1852, aged 26. John Silburn, husband of Eliza, died May 28. 1867, aged 71"
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The transcription of his death certificate follows:-
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Registration District Pocklington
1852 Death in the Sub-district of Pocklington in the County of York
No: 321
1. When and where died: Seventeenth April 1852 Pocklington
2. Name and surname: James Silburn
3. Sex: Male
4. Age: 26 years
5. Occupation: Butcher
6. Cause of death: phthisis Not Certified
7. Signature, description and residence of informant: X The mark of Agnes Ward present at the death Pocklington
8. When registered: Twenty First April 1852
9. Signature of registrar: D Lee Registrar
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Incidentally, Agnes Ward, who registered the death, is recorded in the 1851 Census as a housekeeper for the Silburn family in the Swine Market. She was 55, unmarried and born in Bilsdale.

John Silburn (1834 – 1878))

John was christened, 19th June 1834, IGI Link. He was another of the boys that followed into family business , and the 1861 and 1871 Census shows him as a master butcher working from the Swine Market in Pocklington. He was unmarried when he prematurely passed away, aged 44, in 1878.

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Transcription of Death Certificate of John Silburn --- Registration District Pocklington 1878

Death in the Sub-district of Pocklington in the County of York No: 410
1. When and where died: Sixteenth December 1878 Pocklington
2. Name and Surname: John Silburn
3. Sex: male
4. Age: 44 years
5. Occupation: Butcher Master
6. Cause of Death: Disease of the heart. Bronchitis 1 month Certified by Al FA Fairweather M. D.
7. Signature, description and residence of informant: Henry Silburn Brother present at the death Pocklington
8. When Registered: Eighteenth December 1878
9. Signature of registrar: A V Fowler Registrar

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York Herald - Wednesday 18 December 1878
DEATH
SILBURN.- On the 16th instant, aged 44, Mr. John Silburn, butcher, Pocklington. - The internment will take place at the Cemetery, Pocklington, on Thursday, at Twelve. - (Friends will please accept this intimation)
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William Silburn (1836 – 1872)

William was christened in Pocklington, 17th December 1836, IGI Link. He is the one son of John and Eliza that did not follow his father’s trade but instead that of his mother’s family and worked as a clerk in his uncle's law firm, Powell and Son, qualifying as a solicitor in 1860. He married Annie Sarah Ryan, 7th May 1861. Annie was born in Sunderland in 1841 and her parents were John Ryan and Annie Sarah nee Oley. Her father was a Wesleyan minister, born in Kent, but ministering in the North East and at the time of the marriage was living in York. Her mother came from Shotley Bridge near Newcastle upon Tyne, a family of sword makers. Annie just prior to the marriage, in the 1861 census was living in Chapmangate, and a Teacher of Music. The transcription of the marriage certificate for William Silburn and Annie Sarah Ryan is:-
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Registration District York
1861 Marriage solemnized at the Parish Church in the Parish of St Thomas, York in the County of York
No: 107
1. When Married: May 7th
Groom
2. Name and Surname: William Silburn
3. Age: 24
4. Condition: Bachelor
5. Rank or Profession: Solicitor
6. Residence at time of Marriage: Pocklington
7. Father's Name and Surname: John Silburn
8. Rank or Profession of Father: Gentleman
Bride
2. Name and Surname: Annie Sarah Ryan
3. Age: 20
4. Condition: Spinster
5. Rank or Profession: -
6. Residence at time of Marriage: Union Terrace
7. Father's Name and Surname: John Ryan
8. Rank or Profession of Father: Wesleyan Minister

Married in the Parish Church according to the Rites and Ceremonies of the Established church by license by me J E Sampson Incumbent

This Marriage was solemnized between us. William Silburn, Annie Sarah Ryan
In the presence of us, John Ryan, Mary Jane Ryan
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The witnesses John Ryan is probably her father or possibly her brother and Mary Jane her sister who was two years younger.

William worked and lived in Pocklington as a solicitor until about 1869 when he moved to York. His children's certificates show that they were living in Market Street, Brass Castle Hill and latterly Brunswick House. He was clerk to the Pocklington Union through the middle to late 1860's until his death in 1872. He was involved in a bankruptcy in 1868 which required the sale of the contents of Brunswick house. The details are from newspaper reports.
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York Herald - Saturday 03 October 1868
POCKLINGTON.
SALE OF VALUABLE HOUSEHOLD FURNITURE, PIANO-FORTE, &c.
MR. HAGYARD has received instructions from the trade assignee appointed by the Leeds Bankruptcy Court in re William Silburn, to SELL BY AUCTION, upon the premises Brunswick House, Pocklington, on THURSDAY, the 8th October, 1868, the whole of the Excellent FURNITURE, being the contents of Drawing, Dining, and Four Bedrooms, Hall and Staircase; also Kitchen and Dairy Utensils. The Sale to commence at 10 o'clock in the Forenoon

POCKLINGTON.
TO BE SOLD or LET, the neat HOUSE, in the occupation of Mr. W. Silburn, Solicitor, containing two large and lofty Sitting-Rooms, small Breakfast  Parlour, two Kitchens, Store-Room, Cellar, five Bed-Rooms, small Room for W. C, spacious Court-Yard, Carriage House, two-stalled Stable, Granary, and all requisites. The House is supplied with gas. There is a free Grammar School in Pocklington, endowed with several scholarships from St. John's College, Cambridge.
Possession in October.
To view apply to Mr. J. Stubs, Wheelwright.
Further particulars may be had of John Clabbbon, North Cave, Brough.
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The bankruptcy doesn't seem to have affected his work because there are newspaper reports of him acting as a solicitor throughout the bankruptcy period of a few months. After leaving Brunswick House he moved to York and had an office in New Street as well as still working in Pocklington.
His death was sudden, dramatic and gruesome, being run down by a train in York. I have newspaper of reports of the inquest and although the question of whether it was suicide were asked the verdict was accidental death as he had a reason for being where he was killed and it was an accident black spot. The suicide question was raised because he had lost his youngest son a month earlier on Christmas Day and his second youngest on the same day as, but reportedly after, his own demise. Both died through illness, and the reason given for William crossing the railway lines at this time was that he was on his way to complain to his landlord about the state of the drains, which he and Annie thought were the cause of the children’s ill health. What a trauma for Annie. Subsequently she moved away from Yorkshire and remarried.
The transcription of the death certificate of William Silburn is:
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Registration District York
1872 Death in the Sub-district of Bootham in the City and in the County of York
No: 52
1. When and where died: 22nd January 1872 Township of Clifton
2. Name and surname: William Silburn
3. Sex: Male
4. Age: 35 years
5. Occupation: Solicitor
6. Cause of death: Accidentally killed by being run against and over by a Railway Engine attached to a Railway Train passing on the North Eastern Railway
7. Signature, description and residence of informant: Information received from J. T. Wood, Deputy of John Wood one of the Coroners for the County of York. Inquest held 23rd January 1872
8. When registered: Seventh February 1872
9. Signature of registrar: Thomas Peters Registrar
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The following is the newspaper report of the inquest into William’s death.
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The York Herald Sat Jan 27 1872
Frightful Death of a Solicitor on the Railway at York.
On Monday evening, Mr William Silburn, solicitor, residing at 85 Union Terrace, in this city, and practising both here and at Pocklington, of the Board of Guardians of which latter place he was clerk, was killed in a frightful manner on the railway. Mr Silburn, it appears, had had much illness in his family, one of his children having suffered from typhoid fever. This led to the impression that the drainage was defective, and, by the desire of Mrs Silburn, the deceased, at a quarter past seven on the evening in question, was on his way to speak to his landlord, Mr. Bellerby, of Barton Lane, about it.  He arrived at the Asylum crossing and was seen on the six foot way just as the 7.5 train for Hull via Market Weighton came at the rate of 25 miles an hour. Leaving the city the trains just before reaching this spot emerge in a curve from an embanked way which in the darkness of the night makes it little unlike a tunnel, and there is little doubt the deceased was unaware of approaching danger. He was, however, seen by the engine driver a dozen yards off, and as soon as the engine whistle was sounded, he, doubtless in possession of the fear that he was standing then between the metals upon which the train was travelling, made a leap for his life in his efforts to cross the line. In this, unfortunately, he failed, for, rushing right in front of the engine, he was literally, so far as the upper part of his body was concerned, smashed to pieces. Assistance was shortly at hand, and his remains were taken up and removed to the Workhouse, where on Tuesday evening, Mr. J. P. Wood, coroner, held an inquiry into the cause of death. The following is the evidence which was adduced:-
Joseph Needham deposed: I keep a house known as Thomas's Hotel, in Museum Street. Deceased was at my house on Monday for several hours. He first came at about eleven o'clock in the forenoon and stayed probably for an hour. He partook of beer. He came in again about two o'clock in the afternoon, and he left again about a quarter to six. Whilst he stayed he had several half pints of beer, smoked three or four cigars, and watched some play billiards. When he left he was not the slightest the worse for liquor. He appeared to be in his usual spirits, and I noticed nothing unusual. By Mr Watson; It was not unusual for Mr Silburn to call at my house, and have a few glasses the same as he had on Monday. By the Coroner; He appeared to be in good spirits. By Mr Watson: He has often sat for some time in the billiard room as he did on Monday.
Edward Wiley, of Barton Lane, gardener, deposed: Last night, about seven o'clock. I met a tall man with a high crowned hat walking at the back of the York County Asylum, about two hundred yards from the railway, towards Barton Lane. He made a stagger, went towards the wall, and I gave way for him, remarking to my wife that he appeared to be in liquor. No word passed between us. By Mr. Watson; He did not appear to be loitering; it was raining. There was little moon - it was lightish. By a Juror: He appeared to be taller than me. My impression was that the man was intoxicated.
Joseph Bean, 23, Layerthorpe, stoker at the Gas Works, deposed; I was taking a walk yesterday evening, from a quarter to twenty minutes past seven, in the lane at the back of the Asylum. I was going towards Barton Lane, when I heard an engine whistle on the railway. I was then on the Clarence Street side of it. I stood still until the train stopped. Then I walked up to the gate opening on the railway, again stood, and looked at the engine until it started off again. The engine would be between the Burton Stone gate house and the asylum crossing, but nearer the former. When the engine moved off I was going to walk across the railway and looking up the line I saw what appeared to be a parcel laid. I went towards it to pick it up, and found it to be a man cut in two. I looked for assistance towards Barton Lane, and met a man and a woman, and told them there was a man cut in two on the line. I ran up to some persons with lights who were repairing the line and told then what I had seen. They went back with me to the body, and then the Groves policeman was sent for. I remained with the body until he came, and pulled it out of the five foot into the six foot so as no other train could pass over it. The body was eight or nine yards from the gate further from York. I had before this seen a person walking about fifty yards in front of me all the way down the lane, but lost sight of him at the turn just before reaching the gate. When I heard the whistle the man would have had time to reach the crossing, and the engine appeared to be at that point at the time. I noticed nothing particular in his walking. By a juror: I did not in going up the walk by the Asylum meet the witness Wiley and his wife. By Mr Watson; I did meet a man, but it was not Wiley. The crossing is a dangerous one. The trains come from a dark recess. A person might very easily be run over without being cautious. A juror: I heard a lady the other day say she had a very narrow escape at this very spot. By Mr Watson; There is no signal box.  Another juror: Four trains pass on the average each half hour.  Witness, by Mr Watson; The place where the body was found was where I should think it would be taken by the engine coming into contact with it. There are no lights whatever at the crossing. It was a light night, but raining.
Alfred Dixon, No 10, West Parade, Spring Bank, Hull, engine driver, deposed; I was driving the engine attached to the 7.5 pm train out of York for Hull on Monday. I at the Asylum Crossing saw what appeared to be the figure of a man pass from the four foot to the six foot, and then he seemed to me to either fall of throw himself down in front of my engine. I should be about ten or twelve yards off. I made all endeavour to stop that I could, and sounded my whistle. I shut off the steam, told my mate to hold on, and the train was stopped as quickly as possible. I then got down and examined the engine, but found nothing - neither blood nor flesh on the wheels. The inspector and ganger of the platelayers came at my summons from the Barton Lane crossing, and after I had told them what I had seen I went on with the train. I had felt that I had gone over something, but it was very slight, no more that if we had been going over a bad joint. By a juror; I cannot say whether the object, when I first saw it was moving or not. By Mr Watson; The last I saw of him he appeared to be falling forward. He might have tripped. We were going at the rate of about twenty five miles an hour. Mr Watson: Is not that a great speed at this place. Witness: But we are obliged to keep time. Mr Watson: Taking into consideration the dangerous situation of the crossing and public safety do you not think 25 miles an hour too strong a pace at which to be travelling over this particular spot? Witness: Well, I cannot say. Had it been me I should have waited until the train had gone past. Mr Watson: Is it safe? Witness: I cannot say it is dangerous if people will but look out. Mr Wood suggested that judgment upon the question would be a matter for the jury. Mr Watson (to witness) Then you refuse to give an answer? Witness: If the public keep a lookout as well as the driver, it may be safe. The witness was further pressed but refused to acknowledge that the crossing was a dangerous one; and the Coroner suggested that it was perhaps sufficient that he had acknowledged that the train he was driving was going at the rate of 25 miles an hour.
Anne Sarah Silburn of Union Terrace, deposed: I have seen the body of the deceased, and have identified it as that of my late husband. He was a solicitor residing in York, and 35 years of age. I last saw him alive on Monday morning, about nine o'clock. He appeared to be in good health, and in better spirits than usual, because our child Freddy was better. I did not expect to see him again until night about seven, when he usually came home. He had occasion to go to Barton Lane to see the landlord, Mr Bellerby, as to the drains, the defective state of which we thought caused the illness of our children. We had previously written to the landlord in reference to the matter, and it had been a subject of conversation with my husband on the night before his death, I fully expected he would go on Monday night. He was of a very happy nature, and had nothing on his mind to cause him to commit suicide. He was devotedly attached to the children. He very often walked across the railway to get to Barton Lane.
John Hutton, of the Groves, police constable, deposed: At about half paast 7 o'clock last evening I was sent for, and found the deceased lying in the six foot on the railway in the township of Clifton, in the North Riding. The body about the face, chest, and left arm was smashed to pieces, and frightfully mutilated. With assistance I conveyed it to the Workhouse. I searched the body, and found a purse containing sixpence, and a large number of letters. There was nothing in the letters to indicate the cause of death.
The Coroner then addressed the jury. What they had to consider, he said, was the cause of death, As to that there appeared to be no difficulty. There was no doubt a man had been seen by the engine driver on the line, and that he had been run over by the engine in the manner described. There was, therefore, no question that the deceased had been run over by an engine. The next question was - was it the result of an accident or of suicide? They would remember the expression of the engine driver that he either fell or threw himself on the line; but, after the evidence of Mrs Silburn, he asked if they could have any question that the matter was the result of a pure accident? There might have been some reason to think otherwise had the deceased had no reason for crossing the line, but it appeared from what had fallen from Mrs. Silburn that he had a reason, whilst it likewise appeared that he was the person seen by the witness Bean. The deceased after leaving the sight of Bean had just time to get upon the railway when the whistle sounded, and therefore there could be no doubt that the man killed was the one Bean saw. The person whom Wiley saw could not have been the deceased because the evidence told them that he (deceased) was not the worse for liquor, whilst the man he saw he described as being tall and staggering when he passed him. Well, then, the facts that the deceased had been asked by his wife to see Mr Bellerby, that he was going in that direction in the ordinary manner, that he would arrive on the line just as the engine came up, and was knocked down and killed in the manner described, were before the jury, and it was for them to decide whether the deceased had been accidently killed. If they were not perfectly satisfied on this point they might bring in an open verdict, because there was an absence of evidence that he intended to commit suicide. To him (the Coroner) the evidence was exceedingly strong that it wa a pure accident. As regarded the danger of the level crossing, if they wished to express any opinion he should be glad to forward any recommendation to the directors of the railway company. They had had the fact explained that the crossing was a very awkward place, that the trains at that point came up suddenly and passed rapidly, and that there was no person at the spot to warn passersby. If they thought under the circumstances that trains passed at the rate of 25 miles and hour that there should be a person familiar with the times of the trains passing to warn people, or if they thought there should be a bridge over, he would take care their opinion was forwarded to the proper quarter. At an inquest he remembered some time ago upon a boy killed at that crossing a recommendation was forwarded by the jury; and he hoped that now if another recommendation was forwarded it would be attended to, because that was really a fearful accident.
A juror said he remembered a farmer, of Stillington, being found one morning, after lying all night at this spot, on the line with his legs cut off.
Another juror said this was the fourth fatality he remembered at the spot.
After a brief consideration the jury returned a verdict of "Accidental death". They also begged to express their opinion that the crossing was a dangerous one and that some means ought to be taken by the railway company to prevent the recurrence of further accidents.
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And finally a newspaper report of the funeral in Pocklington:
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York Herald - Saturday 27 January 1872
POCKLINGTON
THE DEATH OF MR SILBURN
Very great gloom was cast over our town on Tuesday morning last, on the arrival of the news of the sudden and lamentable death of Mr Wm Silburn, lately residing in York, and practicing here as a solicitor, being also clerk to the guardians of the Union. The circumstance attending the death of the deceased and the inquest held over his body will be found detailed in another column. Mr Silburn had lost a little boy about three weeks ago, and on the night of the accident another boy four years old died. On Thursday last both father and son were brought to Pocklington by the 10.35 train, and interred in the Pocklington Cemetery. The mourners were Mrs Silburn (the widow) and her two sisters and brothers, Mr John Silburn and Mr Henry Silburn (brothers), and Mr James Powell, solicitor, cousin of the deceased. The funeral cortege was met at the station and followed to the grave by most of the tradesmen and a great number of inhabitants of the town. Mr Silburn was 35 years of age, and leaves a family of four children.
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After William's death his wife Annie left Yorkshire and headed to Darlington were some of her family lived. She married and her tale thereafter is fascinating to me but not very relevant to the History of Pocklington so I will spare you all the telling of it.

William and Annie Sarah had six children John Henry, Norah Eliza Helen, Evelyn Jessie, Reginald James Singleton, Frederick William Muschamp and Arthur Lawrence Bell.

Henry Silburn (1839 – 1916)

Henry Silburn
Photo and names kindly supplied by Dave Silburn.

Seated Henry Silburn (Head of family), Seated Marina Silburn (wife of Henry) Above 1st from left, either it is Silburn Lionel B., son, or Silburn Reginald Singleton Silburn ., son 2nd from left stood Olive M. daughter 3rd from left, stood, Henry Silburn son 4th from left stood, John Silburn son 5th from left Madeline E. daughter seated on floor, left daughter Gladys Helana Silburn seated on floor right is Dave Silburn's grandad, William Underwood Silburn son.
n.b from this photo,  one son is not on the photo [re first  on the left]

It is thought by Dave that this photo was taken at the back of Brass Castle in Pocklington where this family were living in the 1911 census, but he cannot be sure.

Henry was born 27th May and was christened 5th July 1839, IGI Link. The transcription of his birth certificate follows:-
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Registration District Pocklington
1839 Birth in the Sub-district of Pocklington in the County of York
No: 294
1. When and Where: Twenty Seventh of May 1839 Pocklington
2. Name, if any: Henry
3. Sex: Boy
4. Name and Surname of Father: John Silburn
5. Name, surname and maiden surname of mother: Eliza Silburn formerly Powell
6. Occupation of father: Butcher
7. Signature, description and residence of informant: Harriot Silburn Present at the birth Pocklington
8. When Registered: Twentieth of June 1839
9. Signature of registrar: Edward Danson Registrar
_________________________________________________________
Transcription of Marriage Certificate of Henry Silburn and Marina White --- 1879

Marriage solemnized at Parish Church in the Parish of Pocklington in the County of York No: 80.
1. When Married: Nov. 17 1879 Groom:
2. Name and Surname: Henry Silburn
3. Age: 40
4. Condition: Bachelor
5. Rank or Profession: Butcher
6. Residence at time of Marriage: Pocklington
7. Father's Name and Surname: John Silburn
8. Rank of Profession of Father: Butcher
Bride:
2. Name and Surname: Marina White
3. Age: 29
4. Condition: Spinster
5. Rank or Profession: -
6. Residence at time of Marriage: Pocklington
7. Father's Name and Surname: William White
8. Rank of Profession of Father: Minister
Married in the Parish Church according to the Rites and Ceremonies of the Established Church, by License or after ___ by me, J H Wicksteed This Marriage was solemnized between us; Henry Silburn, Marina White In the Presence of us, Robert Cundall, William Shaw
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He, also, followed the family trade to be a butcher in Pocklington, and also went on to become a farmer of 150 acres in Allerthorpe on land adjacent to Allerthorpe Hall where his father, John, and step mother lived. Henry married Marina White in 1879 and had eight children and some of his direct descendants probably still live in the Pocklington area today. Throughout the census records his address is shown as Market Street and in the 1911 Census shown as 21 - 23 Market St, (Castle Hill), Pocklington.

He died 1916 and the Probate entry for him is:
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SILBURN Henry of Pocklington Yorkshire died 2 February 1916 Probate London 18 March to Marina Silburn widow Madoline Eliza Silburn spinster and Lionel Burnell Silburn cattle dealer Effects £5527 15s 5d
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The children of Henry and Marina were Madoline Eliza (1881 – 1964), Henry (1883 – ), John (1883 – ), Lionel Burnell (1884 – 1963), Reginald Singleton (1886 – 1962), Olive Maud (1888 – 1978), William Underwood (1889 – 1969) and Gladys Helena (1891 – 1962).

The Children of William and Annie Sarah Silburn

The children of William and Annie were John Henry, Norah Eliza Helen, Evelyn Jessie, Reginald James Singleton, Frederick William Muschamp and Arthur Lawrence Bell.

John Henry Silburn (1862 – 1930)

William's eldest, John Henry Silburn, was born, 29th July 1862, Brass Castle Hill, Pocklington and christened on the 26th August, IGI Link. The transcription of his birth certificate follows:-
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Registration District Pocklington
1862 Birth in the Sub-district of Pocklington in the County of York
No: 336
1. When and Where: Twenty ninth July 1862 Brass Castle Hill Pocklington
2. Name, if any: John Henry
3. Sex: Boy
4. Name and Surname of Father: William Silburn
5. Name, surname and maiden surname of mother: Annie Sarah Silburn formerly Ryan
6. Occupation of father: Solicitor
7. Signature, description and residence of informant: William Silburn Father Brass Castle Hill Pocklington
8. When Registered: Fourth September 1862
9. Signature of registrar: D Lee Registrar
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John Henry went on to become a solicitor, like his father, practicing mainly in Newcastle. I think he probably attended Pocklington Grammar but certainly went on to be educated at the Archbishop Holgate's School in York, and thereafter to study Law in Darlington, the place where his mother moved to after his father’s deadly accident. He married Emma Bolleter in London at the end of his law studies. She was the daughter of an émigré to London from Switzerland via Vienna, Heinrich Bolleter, who was an associate of Karl Marx when they were both on the council of the International Workingmen's Association. John Henry and Emma had four children, Katherine Helen, Wilfred, Lawrence and Edward Fothergill. They were all brought up in Newcastle upon Tyne. He died 7th August 1930 in Newcastle, just a month after his brother Reginald.

Norah Eliza Helen Silburn (1863 – 1942)

Norah Eliza Helen Silburn was born, 30th October 1863 in Market Street, Pocklington and christened 14th December, IGI Link. The transcription of her birth certificate follows:-
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Registration District POCKLINGTON
1863 Birth in the Sub-district of Pocklington in the County of York
No: 123
1. When and Where born: Thirtieth October 1863 Market Street Pocklington
2. Name, if any: Norah Eliza Helen
3. Sex: Girl
4. Name and Surname of father: William Silburn
5. Name, surname and maiden surname of mother: Annie Sarah Silburn formerly Ryan
6. Occupation of father: Solicitor
7. Signature, description and residence of informant: Will Silburn Father, Market Street, Pocklington
8. When Registered: Fifth December 1863
9. Signature of registrar: H Johnson Registrar
10. Name entered after registration: /
_________________________________________________________
Norah married a man she met while studying at the Armstrong College in Newcastle upon Tyne, Michael Cressé Potter, in 1891. A Who's Who entry for Michael from 1906 reads:-
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POTTER, Michael Cresse, M A Cantab et Dunelin; Professor of Botany, Armstrong College (Univ of Durham), Newcastle upon Tyne since 1893; s. of late Rev R Potter, M A Cantab, Rector of Corley Warwickshire and nephew of late Prof R Potter M A Cantab, University College London. m Norah Helen c d. of late William Silburn, Solicitor, Yorks. Educ: St. Edwards School, Oxford; St Peter's College Cambridge. Mathematical and Natural Sciences Triposes: Worts Travelling Scholar for Botanical Research in Portugal, 1886, and for the study of a Tropical Flora in Celon, 1888-9; studied Botany under Professor Piltzer at Heidelberg, 1887; Curator of the Cambridge _________________________________________________________
She died in New Milton Hampshire on 13th December 1941. Norah and Michael were childless.

Evelyn Jessie Silburn (1865 – 1946)

Evelyn Jessie Silburn was born, 15th March 1865, in Brunswick House Pocklington and christened 20th February, 1866, IGI Link. The transcription of her birth certificate follows:-
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Registration District Pocklington
1865 Birth in the Sub-district of Pocklington in the County of York
No: 451
1. When and Where born: Fifteenth March 1865 Brunswick House Pocklington
2. Name, if any: Evelyn Jessie
3. Sex: Girl
4. Name and Surname of father: William Silburn
5. Name, surname and maiden surname of mother: Annie Sarah Silburn formerly Ryan
6. Occupation of father: Attorney at Law
7. Signature, description and residence of informant: Wm Silburn Father Brunswick House Pocklington
8. When Registered: Twenty Fourth April 1865
9. Signature of registrar: F Johnson Registrar
10. Name entered after registration: /
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She never married and most of her life was dedicated to education. She spent 25 years as headmistress of the Duchess of Northumberland's Secondary School for girls known as The Duchess's School in Alnwick. Her teacher's registration shows her educational achievements:-
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TEACHERS REGISTRATION COUNCIL
Register Entry concerning: SILBURN, EVELYN JESSIE
Date of Registration: 1st July, 1915.
Register Number: 9758
Address: Sandy Bar, ALNMOUTH.
Attainments:
Cambridge Mediaeval and Modern Languages Tripos;
B. Litt, Durham; M.A., T.C.D.
University of Durham Secondary Teachers' Diploma.
Honours Diploma in French, University of Tours.
Senior Honours Certificate in Music, Trinity College of Music.
Oxford Senior Local Honours Certificate, etc.
Training in Teaching: Armstrong College, University of Durham.
Experience:
Head Mistress, Morpeth pupil Teacher Centre and Secondary School, 1904 - 1905;
Head Mistress, The Duchesss' School, Alnwick, 1906 - 1930
_________________________________________________________
Evelyn died 12th June 1916, age 81, in Alnmouth, Northumberland.

Reginald James Singleton Silburn (1866 – 1930)

Reginald James Singleton Silburn was born, 28th August 1866, in Brunswick House Pocklington and christened on 28th August, IGI Link. The transcription of his birth certificate follows:
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Registration District Pocklington
1866 Birth in the Sub-district of Pocklington in the County of York
No: 274
1. When and Where: Twenty eighth August 1866 Brunswick House Pocklington
2. Name, if any: Reginald James Singleton
3. Sex: Boy
4. Name and Surname of Father: William Silburn
5. Name, surname and maiden surname of mother: Annie Sarah Silburn formerly Ryan
6. Occupation of father: Solicitor
7. Signature, description and residence of informant: Wm Silburn Father Brunswick House Pocklington
8. When Registered: Eighth October 1866
9. Signature of registrar: F Johnson Registrar
_________________________________________________________
Like his elder brother, John Henry, Reginald followed his father's profession and became a solicitor and going into business with his brother in Newcastle. In 1902, Reginald married his cousin Evelyn Mary Jessie Dupuis, who was the great granddaughter of JMW Turner, the Royal Academy painter. Reginald and Evelyn had two children Reginald Dupuis and Mary Dupuis Silburn, both born in Hartlepool Durham.
Reginald died 1st July 1930 just a month earlier that his brother John Henry.

Frederick William Muschamp Silburn (1868 – 1872)

Frederick William Muschamp Silburn was born on the 13th January 1869 in Brunswick House, Pocklington and christened on the 14th May, IGI Link. The transcription of his birth certificate follows:-
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Registration District Pocklington
1868 Birth in the Sub-district of Pocklington in the County of York
No: 57
1. When and Where: Thirteenth January 1868 Brunswick House Pocklington
2. Name, if any: Frederick William Muschamp
3. Sex: Boy
4. Name and Surname of Father: William Silburn
5. Name, surname and maiden surname of mother: Annie Sarah Silburn formerly Ryan
6. Occupation of father: Solicitor
7. Signature, description and residence of informant: William Silburn Father Brunswick House Pocklington
8. When Registered: Twelfth February 1868
9. Signature of registrar: F Johnson Registrar
10. Name entered after Registration: /
________________________________________________________
Frederick died of Pneumonia Bronchitis on 27th January 1872. It was a traumatic time for the family because his death occurred on the same night his father William was killed crossing the railway track and a just a month after his brother Arthur. The transcription of his death certificate follows:-
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Registration District York
1872 DEATH in the Sub district of Bootham in the City and in the County of York
No. 36
1. When and where died: Twenty second January 1872 Union Terrace St Giles
2. Name and surname: Frederick William Muschamp Silburn
3. Sex: Male
4. Age: 4 years
5. Occupation: Son of William Silburn a Solicitor
6. Cause of death: Pneumonia Bronchitis Certified
7. Signature, description and residence of informant: Lalla Belle Ryan present at the death Union Terrace York
8. When Registered: Twenty seventh January 1872
9. Signature of registrar: Thomas Peters Registrar
_________________________________________________________
Lalla Bell Ryan who was present at the death and registered it was the sister of the mother Annie Sarah. She was living with the family in the 1871 Census and may well have been helping with the sickly children.

Arthur Lawrence Bell Silburn (1869 – 1871)

Arthur Lawrence Bell Silburn was born on the 16th June 1869 and christened on the 5th July in Saint Mary Bishophill Senior, York, IGI Link. The transcription of his birth certificate follows:-
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Registration District York
1869 Birth in the Sub-district of Micklegate in the City and in the County of York
No: 24
1. When and Where: Sixteenth June 1869 29 Nunthorpe Terrace Bishophill Senior
2. Name, if any: Arthur Lawrence Bell
3. Sex: Male
4. Name and Surname of Father: William Silburn
5. Name, surname and maiden surname of mother: Annie Sarah Silburn formerly Ryan
6. Occupation of father: Attorney at Law
7. Signature, description and residence of informant: William Silburn Father No 29 Nunthorpe Terrace York
8. When Registered: Thirteenth December 1869
9. Signature of registrar: Geo Beale Registrar Henry Brearly Superintendent Registrar
10. Name entered after Registration: /
_________________________________________________________
It was a short life and he died, age 2, of convulsions on Christmas Eve, 1871, just a month before his brother Freddie and father. The transcription of his death certificate follows:-
_________________________________________________________
Registration District York
1872 Death in the Sub district of Bootham in the City and in the County of York.
No. 484
1. When and where died: Twenty fourth December 1871 85 Union Terrace St Giles
2. Name and surname: Arthur Lawrence Bell Silburn
3. Sex: Male
4. Age: 2 years
5. Occupation: Son of William Silburn a Solicitor
6. Cause of death: Convulsions Certified
7. Signature, description and residence of informant: William Silburn present at the death 85 Union Terrace York
8. When Registered: Twenty sixth December 1871
9. Signature of registrar: Thomas Peters Registrar
_________________________________________________________

Other East Riding Silburns

There were other Silburn family lines living in the Pocklington area and wider East Riding of Yorkshire during the 19th century and I believe they all stem from the same family root sometime in the late 17th to early 18th century but as yet I haven't been able to link them all together. I will mention two of these; firstly, William Silburn (1775 – 1854) of Yapham, farmer and latterly of Northfield House, Pocklington. He was living with his housekeeper Elizabeth Stephenson and bequeathed all he had to her and her children; cottages and land in Barmby upon Moor; and, secondly, William Silburn (1794 - 1874), of Newton on Derwent and Goodmanham, who married Sarah Ellison (1802 – 1881).