PocklingtonHistory.com Railway Street (Circa 1880)
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Gallery
Market Place Market Place
Note the new building in the photo on the corner.
Regent Street Regent Street
Note the 'Old Red Lion Hotel'
Chapmangate Chapmangate
Note the independent chapel built in 1807 to the left.
History of Burnby
NB: This information is sourced from an article in the Hull Daily Mail - Monday 3rd October 1927

"MAIL" "HISTORICAL MEMS.

CITY OF HULL AND DISTRICT.

Burnby, a parish and township of 1,700 acres, is situated at Nunburnholme Station, which was given that name to prevent confusion with Burnley in Lancashire.

* * *

Pleasantly situated, less than three miles south-east of Pocklington, Burnby is a small village, which as "Brunebi" held two Manors in Saxon times: one, of four carucates, belonged to the Archbishop of York, and passed at the Conquest, or soon after, from the last Saxon to the first Norman Archbishop.

* * *

Under the latter, Burnby ecclesiastical Manor was held Goisfrid, supposed to have been Saxon, in favour with the Normans, who held two Manors elsewhere as a vassal of William de Percy, two as a vassal of Hugh Fitz Baldric, one as a vassal of Gilbert Jison, and this Manor as a vassal of the Archbishop.

* * *

The smaller Manor in Burnby had belonged to the two Saxons, Bernulf and his former wife, Asa, from whom he was separated. This Manor was acquired by William de Percy. There were also soke lands in Burnby belonging to the Manor of Pocklington and altogether tho area in cultivation at the Conquest was just about the whole acreage of the present township.

* * *

The church must have come into existence in, or soon after, Goisfrid's time. Today it consists of a chancel and nave, with a western bell gable, containing two bells, but formerly the nave had north aisle, and its north wall contains the remains of four Norman arches—12th century work—which have been built in to form the wall and cut off the aisle.

* * *

The chancel east window is round headed, with the dog tooth ornament, and the font is Norman. On the north side are two windows of 14th century style. The church is dedicated to St Giles and its list of vicars from 1282 is complete. The living is an ancient rectory, formerly in the gift the Lords Deyncourt, who held the Manor of the Archbishops from the end of the 13th century—the successors, as its Manor Lords, of Goisfrid. More recently the living has been in the patronage of the Earls of Londesborough.

* * *

How the Manor passed from courts has not been traced, but in it appears to have been held in trust by two chaplains (Thos. de Osgodby and John Bek) for, and passed, fine to, Gerard Salvain and his wife Alice.

* * *

This Gerard Salvain had several transactions in Riding Manors between 1330 and 1365. He was living in 1302, for Archbishop Corbridge authorised the nuns of Swine to receive his daughter there. He purchased North Duffield (1330), half of Holme-on-Spalding (1334), Harswell, Millington and Ottringham (1343). Sand Hall. Burnby, Ottringham, and Thorpe le Street Manors (1365).

* * *

But he could not have long held Burnby, for in the Manor and advowson passed from Elias de Thoresby to Roger de Fulthorpe. At that time John de Thoresby was Archbishop of York.

* * *

We do not find it again until 1563, when is sold by fine Sir John Gascoigno (a descendant of the famous judge) to Edward Gilbert, an alderman of London.

* * *

It was in this same year that Sir John Gasgoine sold some Kirkella lands to the Rishworths, and, in 1594, we find Richard Rishworth selling the Manor of Burnby to John Rudston, ancestor of the Calverley Rudstons.

* * *

Edward Gilbert also, the alderman, was the seller of Sand Hall in 1567.

* * *

We trace the Manor no more till we find it in 1892 in the hands of Sir Charles Anderson, of Lea Hall, Gainsborough.